Abraham Lincoln by James Daugherty

James Henry Daugherty (1889-1974), winner of a Newbery Medal for Children’s Literature, was born in Asheville, North Carolina, but grew up in Indiana and Ohio. When he was 9, the family moved to Washington D.C., where he studied at the Corcoran School of Art, and the Philadelphia Art Academy. He then spent two years in London studying under Frank Brangwyn.

According to the New York Times, Mr. Daugherty “won distinction as a writer and illustrator of children’s books on American historical themes.”

Mr. Daugherty’s books of biography and frontier tales include “Abraham Lincoln,” “The Landing of the Pilgrims,” “West of Boston” and “Their Weight in Wildcats.”

Daugherty’s first publication was an illustration for John Flemming Wilson’s series, Tad Sheldon, Boy Scout (1913). He then worked camouflaging ships and creating four murals in Loew’s State Theatre, Cleveland, while illustrating fiction, and signed and unsigned magazine work. In 1925 he was asked to illustrate R.H. Horne’s King Penguin which he describes as the first book he ever illustrated. In 1926 S.E. White’s Daniel Boone, Wilderness Scout appeared, with Daugherty illustrations. He won the Newbery in 1940 for his self-illustrated Daniel Boone and was runner-up for two Caldecott Medals with Andy and the Lion, 1939, and Gillespie and the Guards, 1957.